All the Wrong Chords by Christine Hurley Deriso #bookreview #hanreview @NetGalley

34773854

Flux Publishing
Release date: 12.12.2017

From Goodreads:
Scarlett Stiles is desperate for a change of scenery after her older brother, Liam, dies of a drug overdose. But spending the summer with her grandfather wasn’t exactly what she had in mind. Luckily, Scarlett finds something to keep her busy—a local rock band looking for a guitarist. Even though playing guitar has been hard since Liam died, Scarlett can’t pass on an opportunity like this, and she can’t take her eyes off the band’s hot lead singer either. Is real happiness just around the corner? Or will she always be haunted by her brother’s death?

Preorder it here https://www.amazon.co.uk/Wrong-Chords-Christine-Hurley-Deriso/dp/1635830109/ref=tmm_pap_swatch_0?_encoding=UTF8&qid=1511710707&sr=8-1  Goodreads https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/34773854-all-the-wrong-chords?from_search=true

The Characters
Scarlett is a relatable teen for anyone who has suffered loss, crushed on the bad boy or used music as an escape. Her relationship with a number of other characters impacts upon her grief in such an understated and real way.

Declan, being the resident player of the novel, is drawn up to be someone rather sketchy and shallow. Others bring layers to the lead singer of the band; beautiful but vain.

Scarlett’s grandfather is much more than a plot device; he’s the exploration of how different generations grieve. While you might not agree with how he goes about things, you will understand completely.

The Plot
The plot is tightly woven over a summer, not too long after the death of Scarlett’s brother. While she grieves, she generates a crush for the lead singer of the local band.

Along the way, she discovers things about herself that helps her revaluate her view of society and the world. There are a number of twists and reveals that keep the plot moving forward until it reaches a satisfying end.

The Writing
Scarlett is given a strong voice throughout the book. It’s clear and engaging, despite a number of repeated phases that can occasionally jolt the free-flowing narrative.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s